REPOSITIONING THE BALLS

Here is a guide on how billiard balls should be reposition on the table.
To keep things simple in the beginning just keep in mind that the red ball always goes on its spot. There are some exceptions to the rule so don’t panic, we will go over this at the end of this guide.

To ensure we are all one the same page and speaking the same language let’s first identify the terminology.

Exam the following table:
billiard_table_spots

The cases

Billiard Balls that Touch Each Other:

Scenario 1: The cue ball touches the red ball.
Repositioning: The cue ball goes to the middle spot and the red at its spot.

Scenario 2: The cue ball touches the opponent’s ball.
Repositioning: The cue ball goes to the middle spot and the opponent’s ball goes to the center spot.

Billiard Balls that Dropped Out of table (its fault in any case):

Scenario 1: The cue ball is dropped out of table.
The dropped out cue ball now is the opponent’s ball.
Repositioning: The dropped out ball goes to the center spot.

Scenario 2: Opponent’s ball is dropped out of table.
The dropped out ball is now the cue ball.
Repositioning: It goes to the middle spot.

Scenario 3: Red ball is dropped out of table.
Repositioning: The red ball goes to its spot.

Scenario 4: Both the cue ball and the opponent’s ball are dropped out of table.
Balls are switching roles.
Repositioning: The cue ball goes to the middle spot and the opponent’s ball goes to the center spot.

Scenario 5: Both the red ball and the cue ball are dropped out of table.
The dropped out cue ball now is the opponent’s ball.
Repositioning: The red ball goes to its spot and the dropped out ball goes to the center spot.

Scenario 6: Both the red ball and opponent’s ball are dropped out of table.
The dropped out ball now is the cue ball.
Repositioning: The red ball goes to its spot and the dropped out ball goes to the middle spot.

Scenario 7: All three balls are dropped out of table.
Repositioning: The cue ball goes to the middle spot, the opponent’s ball goes to the center spot and the red ball goes to its spot.

Exceptions – occupied spots*

When repositioning a billiard ball and its normal spot is no longer available because its being occupied by another ball you must then do the following.

Scenario 1: Cue ball spot is occupied.
Repositioning:
a) if the place is occupied by the red ball, then the cue ball goes to the red’s ball spot.
b) if the place is occupied by the opponent’s ball, then the cue ball goes to the center spot.
c) if the place is occupied by the opponent’s ball and the opponent’s ball spot is occupied by the red ball, then the cue ball goes to the red’s ball spot.
d) if the place is occupied by the red ball and the red’s ball spot is occupied by the opponent’s ball, then the cue ball goes to the center spot.

Scenario 2: Opponent’s ball spot is occupied.
repositioning:
a) if the place is occupied by the red ball, then the opponent’s ball goes to the red’s ball spot.
b) if the place is occupied by the cue ball, then the opponent’s ball goes to the middle spot.
c) if the place is occupied by the cue ball and the cue’s ball spot is occupied by the red ball, then the opponent’s ball goes to the red’s ball spot.
d) if the place is occupied by the red ball and the red’s ball spot is occupied by the cue ball, then the opponent’s ball goes to the middle spot.

Scenario 3: Red’s ball spot is occupied.
Repositioning:
a) if the place is occupied by the cue ball, then the red goes to the middle spot.
b) if the place is occupied by the opponent’s ball, then the red goes to the center spot.
c) if the place is occupied by the opponent’s ball and the center spot is occupied by the cue ball, then the red goes to the middle spot.
d) if the place is occupied by the cue ball and the middle spot is occupied by the opponent’s ball, then the red goes to the center spot.

*a spot is considered occupied when the ball that needs to reposition on it, can not be placed without touching the nearby ball.

3-cushion is like poetry